Photo of Mary Wilks

Mary Wilks

Mary Wilks is an antitrust partner in the Corporate Department and a member of our Private Equity Transactions and Mergers & Acquisitions Groups.

Mary advises on a broad range of EU and UK competition law issues, including multijurisdictional mergers, behavioral investigations, complex supply and distribution arrangements, and foreign investment controls including, notably, the UK’s newly adopted National Security and Investment Act. She advises clients on the competition aspects of transactions including M&A, equity investments, consortium transactions and secondaries.

Mary works across all sectors, with particular experience in consumer products, healthcare, TMT and financial services.

Mary regularly counsels clients on their engagement with the Competition and Markets Authority, the European Commission, and other prominent international enforcement agencies and regulatory authorities.

Mary Wilks has a reputation as an “excellent lawyer” who “plays a leading role on a range of high-profile cases.” According to sources, “She is always fully on top of the detail but also able to pull out the most important points for the case.

Prior to joining Proskauer, Mary was a counsel in the antitrust, competition and trade department at another leading law firm in London.

Welcome to the UK Regulation Round Up, a regular bulletin highlighting the latest developments in UK and EU financial services regulation.

Key developments in March 2024:

28 March

FCA Regulation Round-up: The FCA published its regulation round-up for March 2024.

26 March  

AIFMD II: Directive (EU) 2024/927 amending the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive

Welcome to the UK Regulation Round Up, a regular bulletin highlighting the latest developments in UK and EU financial services regulation.

Key developments in February 2024:

29 February

FCA Regulation Round‑up: The UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) published its regulation round‑up for February 2024.

LIBOR: The FCA published a report containing the outcome of

Following the turn of the new year, our UK Regulatory specialists have examined the key regulatory developments in 2024 impacting a range of UK and European firms within the financial services sector. The key dates have been distilled by the Proskauer team in an easy to read timeline with our commentary.

Download the 2024 European

Welcome to the Regulation Round Up, a regular bulletin highlighting the latest developments in UK and EU financial services regulation.

Key developments in December 2023:

21 December

UK / Swiss Regulatory Co-operation: The UK and Swiss governments signed an agreement on mutual recognition in financial services, the Berne Financial Services Agreement.

SME Test: The delegated

Welcome to the UK Regulation Round Up, a regular bulletin highlighting the latest developments in UK and EU financial services regulation.

Key developments in November 2023:

30 November

Costs and Charges Disclosure: The Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) published a statement in response to concerns about costs and charges disclosure in the PRIIPs key

Welcome to the UK Regulation Round Up, a regular bulletin highlighting the latest developments in UK and EU financial services regulation.

Key developments in October 2023:

31 October

Fund Tokenisation: The Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) published a press release announcing that it has joined the Monetary Authority of Singapore’s Project Guardian, a

“Merger review is about to get thornier. While the FTC and DOJ have been tightening the merger review process incrementally over the course of the Biden administration, the newly proposed HSR rule changes represent a wholesale rethinking of how merger transactions are notified and filed. The new filing requirements, if implemented, would essentially trigger a significant antitrust investigation for every transaction valued above the HSR reporting threshold (currently $111.4 million) – without regard to substantive overlap or potential impact on competition. That, along with the expanded new disclosures aimed squarely at private equity firms and their investors, will make for frank conversations about the requirements and potentially will have a real chilling effect on transactions. Whether this is a wish list meant to be pared down, or something the agency will hold firm on remains to be seen.”

John Ingrassia, Antitrust, Washington, D.C.