Photo of Jeffrey A. Horwitz

Jeffrey A. Horwitz

Jeffrey A. Horwitz is a partner in Proskauer's Corporate Department where he co-heads our Private Equity Real Estate practice and runs our internationally recognized Hospitality, Gaming & Leisure Group. He also has served as co-head of Mergers & Acquisitions and as a member of our Executive Committee.

Jeff is a general corporate and securities lawyer with broad-based experience in mergers and acquisitions, cross-border transactions, and long-term joint ventures. He is regularly engaged to advise boards, management teams and investors on strategic matters, from litigation to personnel to transactions.

Jeff counsels clients on the full range of their activities, from seed capital to public offerings, acquisitions and operational matters, often acting as outside general counsel. He represents major financial institutions, sovereign wealth funds, private equity and family offices in sophisticated financial and other transactions. He has handled deals aggregating nearly $200 billion in value, including tender offers, "going-private" transactions, IPOs, restructuring and structured finance transactions, and mergers and acquisitions in industries as diverse as biotechnology and aerospace, retail and cable television, and education and scrap metal. He regularly handles transactions outside the U.S., including Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Australia, South Africa and India.

 

Leading our Private Equity Real Estate group, he works with a team of 75 lawyers from across the firm advising on complex transactions and disputes relating to real estate, and particularly hotels. Jeff has handled virtually every type of matter, and has worked with virtually every major player in these industries, including transactions for nearly 4,000 hotels comprising more than 300,000 rooms and involving nearly $15 billion. His experience, both in and outside the U.S., extends to hotel and casino development and construction; private clubs, nightclubs, restaurants; theme parks; portfolio and single-property acquisitions; sales and restructurings; financings; management; marketing; reservations systems; litigation counseling and strategic planning; and ancillary services. This breadth of work is key to executing complex and sophisticated transactions, such as the acquisition and sale of branded hotel chains (Fairmont, Raffles, Swissotel, sbe Entertainment, Regent, Motel 6, Red Roof Inns, 21c Museum Hotels, TRIBE, LINE, Saguaro), strategic investments and other arrangements (Huazhu, Faena, Banyan Tree), and REIT transactions (Hospitality Investors Trust, Eagle Hospitality).

As a senior member of our Entertainment Group, Jeff represents The Broadway League (the national trade association for Broadway theatre), the Tony Awards®, and various other joint venture events and producers. In the media industry, Jeff has advised on the acquisition and sale of television, radio, newspaper and magazine properties, and the acquisition and sale of advertising, promotion and marketing agencies, and related joint ventures. He also advises rights holders, including our long-time clients The Leonard Bernstein Office and The George Balanchine Trusts. He leads our team representing TSG Entertainment in film-slate financing deals.

Jeff also frequently represents start-up and development-stage companies, as well as established "traditional" businesses, in online, Internet-related or technology businesses. He has handled organizational and structuring matters, venture capital and other equity placements, restructurings (from "down" rounds to recapitalizations to M&A solutions). He has both company-side and investor experience.

As a frequent speaker at real estate and hospitality events, Jeff regularly presents at The Nolan School of Hotel Administration at Cornell's SC Johnson College of Business, NYU's Jonathan M. Tisch Center of Hospitality, and on M&A and investment matters at lodging investment conferences around the world, including the NYU Hospitality Industry Investment Conference in New York, Americas Lodging Investment Summit in Los Angeles, the International Hotel Investment Forum in Berlin and the Hotel Investment Conference Asia-Pacific in Hong Kong.

Jeff is a member of the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA) Hospitality Investment Roundtable and IREFAC (Industry Real Estate Financing Advisory Council), as well as the Advisory Board of the Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance and has served as a member of the Editorial Board of the Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly and a member of the Advisory Board of the Cornell Center for Hospitality Research. He is a director of The New York Hospitality Council, Inc., a not-for-profit forum for hospitality industry leaders, and is a member of the Real Estate Capital Policy Advisory Committee of The Real Estate Roundtable. He also has served as a director of the America-Israel Chamber of Commerce, and as a member of the French-American Chamber of Commerce in the U.S. and the American Society of Corporate Secretaries. He was the Chairman of the Board of Labyrinth Theater Company and a director of The Jewish Community Center in Manhattan for more than 15 years, a member of the Executive Committee of the Lawyers' Division of UJA-Federation for more than five years and an officer of the Henry Kaufmann Foundation for more than a dozen years. He was a founder and chairman of The American Playwriting Foundation. He currently serves as Chairman of the Board of Building for the Arts and is a member of the Board of Directors of StreetSquash. He also served as a Vice Chair of the Associates' Campaign for The Legal Aid Society.

Jeff has been with the firm for his entire career and lives in Manhattan and Connecticut.

On March 1, 2024, Judge Liles C. Burke of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama ruled that the Corporate Transparency Act (the “CTA”) is unconstitutional[1], leaving its future uncertain. The CTA requires reporting companies to report to FinCEN information about their beneficial owners and company applicants and is intended to help prevent and combat money laundering, terrorist financing, tax fraud and other illicit activity.  The ruling enjoined U.S. Department of the Treasury, FinCEN and any other federal agency from enforcing the CTA against the plaintiffs but introduces uncertainty as to the applicability to other reporting companies. 

On January 12, 2024, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) released additional FAQs[1] in response to questions received regarding compliance with various aspects of the Corporate Transparency Act’s Beneficial Ownership Reporting Rule (the “BOI Rule”), which came into effect on January 1, 2024.[2]  One such question

On December 21, 2023, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) issued the final rule on Beneficial Ownership Information Access and Safeguards (the “Access Rule”) laying out the protocols for access to the beneficial ownership database by law enforcement and by eligible financial institutions. The Corporate Transparency Act requires reporting companies

In 2021, the Corporate Transparency Act (the “CTA”) was enacted into U.S. federal law as part of a multi‑national effort to rein in the use of entities to mask illegal activity. The CTA directs the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) to propose rules requiring certain types of entities to file

Today, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) issued a final rule aimed to ease compliance with certain aspects of the regulations promulgated under the Corporate Transparency Act.  The final rule extends the deadline from 30 days to 90 days for entities created or registered during 2024 that do not qualify for an

As the effective date of the US federal Corporate Transparency Act approaches, FinCEN continues to develop its rules almost on a daily basis. Within the past few days, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) published notice of proposals aimed to clarify and ease compliance with certain aspects of the regulations promulgated under the Corporate Transparency Act. The Corporate Transparency Act requires certain entities (“reporting companies”) to report to FinCEN information about their beneficial owners and company applicants, and is intended to help prevent and combat money laundering, terrorist financing, tax fraud and other illicit activity.[1] The Beneficial Ownership Reporting Rule (the “BOI Rule”), promulgated by FinCEN in September of 2022, establishes who are reporting companies and their beneficial owners and company applicants, as well as what information is required to be reported about these entities and individuals.

In 2021, the U.S. enacted the Corporate Transparency Act (the “CTA”) as part of a multi‑national effort to rein in the use of entities to mask illegal activity.  The CTA directs the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) to propose rules requiring certain types of entities to file a report identifying the entities’ beneficial owners and the persons who formed the entity.  FinCEN issued the final rule on Beneficial Ownership Information Reporting Requirements (the “Reporting Rule”) on September 29, 2022. FinCEN recently published a Small Entity Compliance Guide intended to assist entities in determining whether they are required to file a report and what information will need to be reported.  The Reporting Rule will become effective on January 1, 2024.

On January 1, 2021, Congress enacted the Corporate Transparency Act (the “CTA”) as part of the Anti-Money Laundering Act of 2020 in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021.  Congress passed the CTA to “better enable critical national security, intelligence, and law enforcement efforts to counter money laundering, the financing of terrorism, and other illicit activity.” The CTA requires a range of entities, primarily smaller, otherwise unregulated companies, to file a report with the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) identifying the entities’ beneficial owners—the persons who ultimately own or control the company—and provide similar identifying information about the persons who formed the entity. The CTA also authorizes FinCEN to disclose this information to authorized government authorities and to financial institutions in certain circumstances.

Summary of the Corporate Transparency Act under the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021

On January 1, 2021, the Corporate Transparency Act (the “CTA”), which is part of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, became effective after both houses of Congress overrode a presidential veto. The CTA amends the Bank Secrecy Act (the “BSA”) and, once the Treasury Department’s reporting procedures and standards are established, it will require many companies, which have historically been unregulated, to file a report with the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) identifying the companies’ beneficial owners. In an attempt to ban anonymous shell companies and “better enable critical national security, intelligence, and law enforcement efforts to counter money laundering, the financing of terrorism, and other illicit activity,” government authorities will, for the first time, have access to a database of such beneficial ownership information.